Wrongness of CPCs in State Budget – LTEs and Op-Eds

Raleigh NOW did an action at their August meeting to write LTEs on inappropriateness of taxpayer money going to crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs), which are also known as anti-abortion clinics and fake clinics. Some of these were written when the Senate’s state budget was available, allocating $4 million to CPCs and anti-abortion organizations. Later, it came out that the NC House was allocating $9 million to CPCs and anti-abortion organizations!! Both should be allocating NOTHING. Others are writing about this too. If you write something, please email it to me or post here, whether it gets published or not.

North Carolina NOW Legislative Update – 13 September 2021

Yes, the legislature is still in session.  And, no, there is still no agreement between the House and the Senate on the budget.  Can we look forward to an agreement soon?  No, because Senate leader Phil Berger has said that we should not expect a budget until the end of September or the beginning of October. But his prediction will need to be updated because there has been a complicating development.

De Pas: Shocked To Learn My Tax Dollars Going to Anti-Abortion CPCs

What happened to “separation of church and state”? I was shocked to learn that my NC tax dollars are being used to support anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers (“CPCs”) in the House version of the state budget for $9 million. The mission of these CPCs is to eradicate abortion as an option for pregnant women.

Maddox: State Budget Gifts CPCs and Starves Public Education

LTE on wrong NC state budget priorities – continuing to cheat teachers of decent pay while funneling millions to anti-abortion clinics.

North Carolina NOW Legislative Update – 30 August 2021

HB 608 has passed the Senate, this bill makes significant reforms in the treatment of women prisoners. We are expecting unconstitutional districts from the legislative majority again. Then more on the budget process and what happened two years ago.

North Carolina NOW Legislative Actions – 23 August 2021

Take actions on up to 4 issues. In fact, for each issue, you can write your representative, write a letter to the editor, or both!

Richards: Funding for CPCs should be removed from the budget

Stop state funding of Crisis Pregnancy Centers. CPCs don’t act in the interest of the majority of N.C. women. They are private, often religious based, organizations whose goal is to undermine a woman’s reproductive rights. They are not staffed by medical professionals. They use scare tactics to dissuade women from exercising their right to choose to end a pregnancy.

Take action against outrageous CPC allocations in NC Budgets

So far there has been little to no media coverage of the millions of dollars of taxpayer money that both Senate and House budgets are allocating for crisis pregnancy centers, CPCs. The amount of money allocated for these fake clinics keeps going up. For the 2021/2022 budget, the Senate proposed $4 million to CPCs, andContinue reading “Take action against outrageous CPC allocations in NC Budgets”

North Carolina NOW Legislative Update – 16 August 2021

Senate Bill 35 has passed the House and has been placed on the Senate calendar for final approval on August 16. This bill raises the marriage age to 16 under all circum-stances, including pregnancy, requires parental consent for marriage at age 16 or 17, and further requires that there must be no more than a 4-year age difference between the parties to allow marriage under age 18.  The bill is expected to pass. Currently, children as young as 14 can marry in this state, a situation that has made North Carolina a go-to state for child marriages.  Last year, for example, two-thirds of marriage license applications in Buncombe County, a county that includes Asheville, were from out-of staters seeking to marry underage partners.  We are finally ready to close the book on that ugly chapter.  Also talking about state budget, Governor Cooper’s priorities, and how state budget defectors take leverage away from the governor.

Citizens Deserve Input on State Budget, 2021

Kathy Greggs, a US Army combat veteran from Fayetteville, went to the Legislature to speak to the state House Appropriations Committee for Health and Human Services to urge lawmakers to expand Medicaid, expand workers’ rights, and pass affordable housing protections. Although Greggs and others were able to sign up to speak, they were told they couldn’t speak. Greggs didn’t accept that. Here is what happened.