Category Archives: racism

Community Conversation: Illusion of Race, Fayetteville, 3/19/18

Join Fayetteville NOW and its coalition partners, on 3/19/18, at 6pm, Pate Room, Main Library, for the showing of the documentary, “Race: The Power of an Illusion.” This documentary questions the belief that racial differences are innate. A facilitated discussion follows the viewing of this film. 

The coalition is a partnership between the Fayetteville-Cumberland Human Relations Commission, Cumberland County Association of Educators, Cumberland County Public Library, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., the NAACP, NOW and the Quaker House.

The Fayetteville Observer announced the event in article “Human Relations Commission to hold conversation on race,” on 2/27/18. 

Continue reading


Equal Means Equal Showing in Chapel Hill on 2/17/18

Women are guaranteed equal rights under the law, right? No?!!

If you have not seen this important documentary, Equal Means Equal, now is your chance! If you’ve only seen it once, you may want to see it again. It shows us the real situation of women in the United States. Very intense. We will discuss afterward.

Date: Sat. Feb. 17th, 2018
Time: 10 am to 1 pm
Place: Chapel Hill Public Library
Reservations: Appreciated, Thru Eventbrite.
Cost: Free

Organized by Durham NOW 

Equal Means Equal in Northeast Raleigh on 11/10/17

Women are guaranteed equal rights under the law, right? No?!!

Equal Means Equal is being shown on Friday, Nov 10, in NorthEast Raleigh. If you haven’t seen it yet, you really should see it. If you’ve only seen it once, you may want to see it again. It shows us the real situation of women in the United States. Very intense. We will discuss afterward.

Date: Friday, Nov. 10, 2017
Time: 6:30pm-9:30pm
Place: at the Universalist Unitarians Peace Fellowship at 4104 Watkins Rd, Raleigh, North Carolina 27616

Continue reading

Encore Presentation of Cracking Codes Starts 10/9/17 in Fayetteville

Fayetteville NOW, Quaker House, Fayetteville Chapter of the NAACP, and other organizations have been running a video series to open and facilitate discussions on racism. The video is shown and discussed in 3 parts, one part per session for 3 sessions. Each session is standalone and is also useful as part of the series. They have run this with documentary ‘Cracking the Codes: The System Of Racial Inequity‘ multiple times, and they have also used another documentary the same way.

Continue reading

Women’s Equality Day History – Right to Vote Not Enough

Saturday August 26 is Women’s Equality Day, which celebrates women getting the right to vote. This right was granted by the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution.

It is shocking to realize that American Women didn’t win the right to vote until 1920. We won this right after many hard fought battles lasting over 72 years, counting from 1848 and Seneca Falls, when the fight got more focused. In truth, the women’s suffrage movement dates as far back as the Revolutionary War. Still, not all women got the right to vote in 1920.

Women’s Suffrage March Photo Credit: Paul Thompson (Getty Images)

Continue reading

Examining issue of mass incarceration in Fayetteville, “13th”

13th Movie and Discussion, by Fayetteville NOW President Sharon Johnson

Fayetteville NOW, continuing its efforts to improve race relations through constructive dialogue, sponsored a showing of the documentary, 13th, on Monday, June 19, 2017.  Outstanding turnout at an event with many co-sponsors.

This documentary examines the disproportionate number of African-Americans incarcerated in the U.S. The film included interviews with prominent civil-rights activists and politicians, and examines the nation’s legacy of racism via such events as the rise of the Ku Klux Klan and the passage of Jim Crow laws in the South.

Continue reading

Can we make immigrant children safe in schools?

You are invited to a community forum about the calls for a Safe Zone Resolution and Policy for immigrant students in Wake County Public School (WCPSS).

WCPSS Board members, County Commissioners, the Mayor and City Council members have been invited to listen to stories from immigrant students, families, and advocates about their experiences in schools in the current political climate, the increase in racist incidents, and the clarification of boundaries for School Resource Officers’ (SRO’s) interactions with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

Durham Community rallying to protect Wildin Acosta, a student grabbed on his way to school one morning. Photo Credit: ABC News


The description is available in Spanish as well as English at the FB Page Event at

Why Tillis does not know what to expect at Town Halls

In “Tillis is open to town halls, minus shouting,” 3/6/17, N&O, Senator Thom Tillis alleges that people who go to his town hall meetings shout and call names, so he doesn’t go. In fact, he has not been to a town hall meeting this year (the $25 a head Durham Chamber of Commerce meeting on March 6 does not count, nor does the March 7th phone call he offered with only an hours’ notice on social media). It is natural he does not know what to expect.

Senator Tillis, we have been to two town hall meetings held in your honor, and you’ve got it all wrong.   

First, the people there are not scary or menacing. They look like, well, people. You don’t have to take our word for it though, there are lots of pictures online.

Speakers lined up at this town hall meeting to share their concerns and fears. Respectful pictures of Senators Tillis and Burr at front of room. Photo Credit: Sarah Sydney

Continue reading

So many friends old and new at HKonJ, a homegrown phenomenon!

We had an unbelievable turnout at the Moral March and HKonJ Assembly on 2/11/17, in Raleigh. According to signs and songs, people are upset with NC’s leadership, and also with chaos from the whitehouse, and unfit nominees being confirmed to 45’s administration despite valid arguments against them and many protests. One example is Betsy DeVos, and Senators Burr and Tillis ignoring their constituents. Read more in “Burr and Tillis: F for Fail!”

Marchers gathered at Memorial Auditorium, at 2 E. South Street, for speeches and singing, and marched together to the end of Fayetteville St, with the State Capitol in the background.


Hats and signs! Photo Credit: Elise Paliga

Continue reading

Moral Monday in June: A Congregation of Citizens

By Zoe Boggs

             Across the street from the North Carolina State Legislative Building, a diverse crowd sat, stood, held signs, and listened intently. People of all ages, races, religions, and sexual orientations celebrated their differences, but most importantly, their common goals. This was June 20, 2016 and we were at a Moral Monday event, held by the NAACP and allies to protest HB2 and remember the Orlando victims and the Charleston 9 victims. The week before, on June 12 in Orlando, FL, a gunman “carried out the worst mass shooting in United States history, leaving 50 people dead and 53 wounded” at a gay nightclub doing its weekly “Upscale Latin Saturdays” party. Then on Jun 18, nine people were murdered at a historic African-American Church in Charleston, South Carolina, where they were doing bible study.

Moral Monday Participant Photo Credit: Elaina Athans

Moral Monday Participant Photo Credit: Elaina Athans

Continue reading