Roe 2021: What is Status of Abortion Access in NC?

It’s been 48 years since the Roe v. Wade decision made abortion legal in this country. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG) was a huge advocate for women, but “she was not that fond of Roe v. Wade as a decision,” because she believed the landmark ruling was too sweeping and vulnerable to attacks, according to Professor Mary Hartnett, who co-authored a biography of RBG. RBG, who passed away on September 18, 2020, was the focus of our pro-choice signature ad this year. RBG was right! Legal abortion has been under attack since it was legalized in 1973, and those attacks have ramped up in North Carolina since 2011. 

Watch “Roe 2021: Will There Be Choice in NC?” Here!

Wondering about the future of abortion access in NC? Anti-abortion lawmakers dominate the legislative leadership and the Supreme Court of the United States.  What happens in NC if Roe falls? What other options do we have? How can we help get access to other options? NOW chapters had a panel of experts via Zoom on January 27th, and you can watch it any time at the link in this post.  

Roe 2021: Will There Be Choice in NC?

Chapel Hill NOW, Durham NOW, and Raleigh NOW (North Carolina) are collaborating on a Zoom event to commemorate the 48th anniversary of Roe v. Wade on January 27th. Our speakers are looking at the future of reproductive access if the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) should be able to overrule or otherwise undo the Roe v. Wade decision which gave women control over their own bodies. Speakers will talk about what NC law would revert to without Roe, and also how telemedicine is changing abortion health care.

Davis: Lawsuit Challenges Abortion Restrictions in North Carolina

A lawsuit filed by the Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina along with abortion providers and reproductive justice organizations is challenging five medically unnecessary restrictions on abortion passed over the years.  The suit was filed in Wake County Superior Court. These restrictions have pushed abortion out of reach in N.C. and have stigmatized essential health care. The suit holds that the restrictions deny basic rights guaranteed under the North Carolina Constitution  and disproportionately impact communities of color, especially Black communities, along with rural communities.